What’s Eating My Garbage?
27 Sep 2016

What’s Eating My Garbage?

27 Sep 2016

Well, hopefully not raccoons or bears.

If you are a backyard composter, or you compost with Table to Farm Compost, millions of bacteria, fungi, these things called actinomycetes, and even a few larger organisms like worms, are all doing their part to turn your food scraps and other materials into nutrient-rich compost.

The first things these little guys need to do their job are carbon and nitrogen. The carbon, which is found in dry woody materials like brown leaves, wood chips, sawdust, and wood ash, is their food. The nitrogen, which is often green “living” materials, is comprised of things like food scraps, green grass clippings, and manure. It’s important to maintain the right proportions of carbon and nitrogen to make good compost.

Next comes the water and air. The types of micro-organisms we want to encourage are what’s called “aerobic.” This means they require oxygen to survive. In some types of compost piles, this means “turning” the pile to introduce new oxygen. The way we do this at Table to Farm Compost is by using what’s called “static aerated piles.” We don’t need to turn our piles much because we have pipes under our piles that pump air up into the compost.

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